Tag Archives: fun

Schmidt Student Interview 2


This week, we’re featuring our student worker Layne Dexheimer.

How long have you been working at the Schmidt?
Since the beginning of Spring 2017

What is the strangest question you’ve been asked while working at the Schmidt?
Am I allowed to look around?

What is your go-to media when creating your own work?
I am still experimenting with as many mediums as I can.

You’re put in charge for a week. Who do you hire and why?
Nicole and Jessica.

What has been your favorite exhibition so far?
I love the [SWIC] Faculty Show because it showcases the abilities of those I am learning from.

What’s your favorite media to exhibit?
I would love to work on an installation piece.

Layne Dexheimer

Layne Dexheimer

If you could demand to have one artist show at the Schmidt, who would it be and why?
Ai Weiwei

What are your hopes for the Schmidt in the future?
[That they] are able to collect even more art.

Possibly the most important question: What music do you listen to when you’re working on your art?
I listen to anything and everything.

Where are you going after this?
I am transferring to Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

Student Worker Interview: Nicole Marianovich


Next on the easel, Nicole Marianovich, our student worker.

How long have you been working at the Schmidt?
I have been a Schmidter for about 7 months-ish.

What is the strangest question you’ve been asked while working here?
I don’t recall.

What is your go-to media as an art student?
My go-to media is pencil/charcoal, but lately it has been oil paint.

You’re put in charge for a week. Who do you hire and why?
If I was put in charge for a week I would hire my roommate, Xero, (aka Sean), and my manager, Shawn, because they both are very creative artists with an eye for detail. Xero is also an engineer major so I’m sure he would come up with some awesome ideas.

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Student Worker Nicole Marianovich

What has been your favorite exhibition so far?
My favorite exhibition so far while working here has been both the Faculty Art Show and the Senior Show. The High School and SWIC [Student] Show are also on my fave list! Though, I’m sure that list will grow and grow!

What’s your favorite media to exhibit?
My favorite media to exhibit is framed pencil/charcoal drawings, however, this semester I’m taking a sculpture class so I’m excited to see what my 3D art looks like displayed on a pedestal.

If you could demand to have one artist show at the Schmidt, who would it be and why?
If I could demand to have one artist show at the Schmidt it would be such a difficult decision that I would have to flips coins and draw straws. Lately, I have been really into the whimsical side of the art world, exploring content such as fairies and moon phases, that I wouldn’t mind being surrounded by the works of Brian Froud and feeling like I’m in the World of Faerie!

What are your hopes for the Schmidt in the future?
My hopes for the Schmidt in the future are that it continues to display art from all over the world and locally, and that maybe one day I will be a Senior Schmidter!! ( Nicole Junior Senior has a nice ring to it!)
[To distinguish Nicole from curator Nicole, we affectionately refer to them as Nicole Junior and Nicole Senior, respectively.]

Possibly the most important question: What music do you listen to when you’re working on your art?
The music I listen to while working on my art varies depending on what I’m working on and the mood I’m in. Here lately, I have been turning my Pandora on Halsey radio and just letting it play out. I’ve also tuned into The Glass Animals and Portishead on YouTube and letting that take me down its own unique rabbit hole.

 

Our Student Worker Interviews are Back!


It’s a new semester, and we have new students workers/interns/scholarship students at the Schmidt. It’s that time again to introduce you to them.

First on the easel: Gretchen Engelbrecht, one of our scholarship students.

How long have you been working at the Schmidt?
This is my second semester of working at the Schmidt.

What is the strangest question you’ve been asked while working here?
Once someone asked if the cup of pencils on the desk were an art piece. They were not.

What is your go-to media as an art student?
Oil paint or ink

You’re put in charge for a week. Who do you hire and why?
I would hire someone organized and able to work delicately, with an appreciation for the art coming in and out.

Gretchen Engelbrecht

Gretchen Engelbrecht

What has been your favorite exhibition so far?
My favorite exhibition was Timothy Norton’s: BOOKSINMYLIFE.

What’s your favorite media to exhibit?
My favorite media is whichever is easiest to install, though I’m sure I’d be love to work with an installation piece if given the chance.

If you could demand to have one artist show at the Schmidt, who would it be and why?
I would want Ai Wei Wei because I enjoy his work and think it pushes buttons that need to be pushed.

What are your hopes for the Schmidt in the future?
I hope that eventually the building will be expanded so there are more classrooms and gallery spaces available for art to be displayed.

Possibly the most important question: What music do you listen to when you’re working on your art?
The music I listen to is usually trip-hop or smooth jazz, nothing to ambient or too loud.

Where are you going after this?
I’m transferring to Ohio State.

Register Now for our Arts Education Classes!


artseducation_spring2017_slider2Our popular classes return again this spring! Registration is now available for our popular K-12th grade classes. Hurry while there’s still availability!

http://www.swic.edu/theschmidt/education/

Coming Soon! Art Scavenger Hunt


"Linger Longer Loo" by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (detail)

“Linger Longer Loo” by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (detail)

The Case of the Missing “Linger Longer Loo”

Artist: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Title: Linger Longer Loo
Date: 1898
Medium: Lithograph

The year is 1898 and artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is distraught. Henri’s lithograph, Linger Longer Loo, is no longer lingering in its beautiful golden frame. Where has it gone? To the loo? Doubtful.

The artist needs you to solve the mystery. The police have five suspects. Read about each suspect, use hints in your field notes guide, and scour the city of Belleville for clues. Make it to the last location and submit your verdict to win.

As you begin your quest, we leave you these final words from the great Sherlock Homes: “When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

How to Play

To help you in your quest for the stolen artwork, you will need to read carefully the characters’ information, hints in the field notes when applicable, and clues at each Belleville site. Based on the information provided, one character should be eliminated as a suspect at each site unless otherwise noted in your journal. Use your field notes journal to help keep track. By the final location you will have two suspects left that could have done it, but which one? At that location you will find a box in which to submit your final answer.

Good luck!

Object

The object of the game is to discover the answer to these three questions:
1. Who did it?
2. Where is the artwork?
3. Why did the person take it?

Guidelines/Rules

The mystery begins Tuesday, October 4, and will continue through Monday, October 31. All answers must be submitted at the final destination by October 31 at 3 p.m.
Please note: some clues may require additional research and some clue sites may have specific hours of operation. To find that information, you will need to go to that location’s website. Family members of staff from participating organizations are unable to play. Open to all ages. One entry per person.

Registration Open for Arts Ed Classes


Registration is now open for our popular fall semester classes. For every grade level, from kindergarten through high school, there’s something for every child and young adult!

For information and to register, visit http://www.swic.edu/sac/education/.Chalk_Slider

Typewriter Tim: Zen & the Art of Typewriter Tim


Typewriter Tim's "Balance," metal and glass

Typewriter Tim’s “Balance,” metal and glass

Tim Jordan, aka Typewriter Tim, started playing the typewriter as a percussive instrument while studying painting at the University of Kansas. Soon after, he got the idea to blowtorch manual typewriters, and did so after someone told him that he couldn’t. From there, he stumbled upon the idea of infusing glass into them after accidentally jamming some glass dips into an old one, and spent years finding a glass blower that would let him experiment with mixing glass and metal – something that you’re not supposed to do.

When he’s not blowing glass into typewriters or playing improvisational funk music with his band, he is an art facilitator and therapist at Artists First at the Turner Center for the Arts.

Typewriter Tim's "Untitled #1," metal

Typewriter Tim’s “Untitled #1,” metal, and charcoal and ink drawings “Happy Accident” and “From the Top”

Artist Statement:
I started playing the typewriter as a percussive instrument while studying painting at The University of Kansas in 1993. Soon after, I started blowtorching typewriters after someone told me I couldn’t. I “accidentally” jammed some glass dips I had upside down into a torched typewriter. I then became obsessed with recreating that effect without glue.

For the next 10 years I asked every glassblower in the region I was in to help me pour glass through typewriters and they all said the same thing, “Glass doesn’t mix with metal. It won’t work.”

I moved back to St. Louis from Los Angeles and got a random phone call from someone at The Third Degree Glass Factory after he heard what I wanted to do. I couldn’t believe it because I had already given up my quest to find a glassblower by then. So we started burning, filling, ladling, dripping, flipping, pouring, wrapping, and playing with glass and typewriters and their parts, having the greatest time doing it.

My bands play the most beautiful improvisational funk music with a typewriter player for 3-4 hours nonstop just like how we throw 2200° glass on interesting metal machines.

Zen and the Art of Typewriter Tim is a retrospective of process, duality, setting the stage, letting go, and the work creates itself with the help of my friends. I like the idea of things that don’t mix, and are extremely different, getting along and being cool. People think it’s funny that I hate to type. My smug answer is that typewriters don’t type. We just sit there, waiting for a muse. That part is you.

Typewriter Tim's "Untitled," metal and glass

Typewriter Tim’s “Untitled,” metal and glass

Typewriter Tim’s exhibition runs through February 25th. For more information, visit swic.edu/TheSchmidt.