Artist Spotlight: Albert Yowshien Kuo


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
As an Asian American I was caught between being the right Chinese and the right American. Growing up, the word discrimination was a common term in the household and carried two very different definitions.  For that reason I feel akin to the major minority groups’ experience as Americans and this is where these pieces come from. The work is about dualities, for without us, there is no “them.”

The pieces in the show presents brightly-colored forms in varied chroma. The forms have an intentionally undefined nomenclature. This is a rejection of formalism. Without the ability to label these forms they become free from prejudice. The bright colors come from a distinctly American history, particularly the energetic palettes used by various African American painters during the great migration through to the civil rights movement; a legacy of color and context that carries its weight today. The surrounding layers evoke the contradiction between natural symmetry and order and the human imposed barriers and exclusionary infrastructure it inspires.

Works
The Dividing Line but an Attempt to Close the Gap (After Michelangelo’s Sistine), 2016
66” x 72”
acrylic and Flashe on canvas, fibers

Body Gardens in a Democratic State, 2016
66” x 72”
acrylic and Flashe on canvas, fibers

City Dwellers, 2016
47” x 48”
oil and mixed media on canvas

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Kuo’s “The Dividing Line but an Attempt to Close the Gap (After Michelangelo’s Sistine)”

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Kuo’s “City Dwellers” (left)

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Detail of “The Dividing Line but an Attempt to Close the Gap (After Michelangelo’s Sistine)”

Artist Spotlight: Cory Sellers


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
December Paintings 2016
My work deals a lot with the investigation of space. I am greatly interested in pictorial drama and illusionism within that space. Not always real, this is a contradiction which adds to the complexity of the painting. The space that the forms live in have a certain feel of solitude, which I believe goes along with the mystery. I am also interested in the decision process of the composition and why each mark is next to another as well as the speed, slow or fast, of the other mark-making that is taking place. There are several things I use to create depth in the paintings, color and contrasting values, but the variety of mark-making and placement has been my recent interest. My December Paintings have been a refinement in my work as I have eliminated the figure with ambitions to improve my abstractions.

Works
Farewell, 2016
12” x 9”
acrylic on canvas

 

Easy Does It, 2016
12” x 9”
acrylic on canvas

Painting, December 6th 2016, 2016
20” x 15”
acrylic, spray paint on canvas

Refine, 2016
20” x 15”
acrylic on canvas

Icebreaker, 2016
14” x 11”
acrylic on canvas

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Sellers’ “Icebreaker,” “Farewell,” and “Easy Does It” (left to right)

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Sellers’ “December 6th 2016”

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Sellers’ “December 6th 2016” (left) and “Refine” (right)

Artist Spotlight: Nancy Friederich


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
The Pathway series of paintings that I am presently working on includes some of my favorite places and countries that I have had the pleasure to visit.

The botanical garden painting is from the Missouri Botanical Garden, one of my favorite places. This lovely lady allowed me to take her picture in another location in the garden. I placed her on this path.

The cemetery scene is from my grandfather’s birthplace in southern Hungary. We were there looking for our family name on tombstones. We didn’t find any family members, but my mother had an interesting conversation (in Hungarian) with the lovely women caring for the graves of their loved ones. It was a special Saturday evening for all of us.

The painting I have just begun will also be part of the Pathway series, and is based on a visit I took to a small mountain village in Peru. I am anxious to paint this one.

Works
Sunday Stroll at the Botanical Garden, 2015
50” x 37”
oil on paper

Roses, 2015
37” x 50”
oil on paper

The Gathering, Barcs, Hungary, 2016
37” x 50”
oil on paper

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Friederich’s “Roses”

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Friederich’s “The Gathering, Barcs, Hungary”

Artist Spotlight: Dawn Blum


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
I am first and foremost a straight photographer, though my appetite to learn has led me to experiment with other traditional mediums as of late. The transient nature of things, stuff, and life itself is center to my current work.

Works
Compulsory Mechanics, 2016
11 ¼” x 14 ¼”
silver gelatin prints

Disengage, 2016
13” x 7” x 8”
organic & found materials, copper leaf

Limited Expansion, 2016
4” x 7 ¾” x 9”
paper, copper leaf, found objects

Listless Passage, 2016-17
22 ⅛” x 12 ⅛”
digital photography

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Blum’s “Listless Passage”

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Blum’s “Limited Expansion” (left) and “Disengage” (right)

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Detail of Blum’s “Limited Expansion”

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Blum’s “Compulsory Mechanics” (one of three)

Artist Spotlight: William Todd May


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement

Clay and the history of clay objects dates back to the beginning of the Paleolithic Era. My life and work then as a studio ceramics artist connects me with a long tradition of making objects to be admired for their process to record mark-making through these ceramic objects. By firing these artistic expressions and formulation of the glazes, I become extremely connected to these ceramic forms. Like nature, I am recording each change through earth, water, wind, and fire. I become a recorder of the ceramic process and seek truth through universal beauty. This, after hours and decades of experience, becomes nature and is recorded in the process of studio ceramics.

I am a potter and very proud of my life’s work in the medium of clay.

Works

Bowl & Cup, 2016
6” x 6” x 3”
clay

Bowl & Cup, 2016
3” x 6” x 6”
clay

Guardian of the Vessel, 2016
13” x 6” x 6”
clay

Copper Red Vase, 2016
12” x 6” x 6”
clay

Guardian Urn, 2016
9” x 6” x 6”
clay

Copper Red Bowl, 2016
5” x 10” x 10”
clay

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May’s “Bowl and Cup” with “Guardian of the Vessel” in the background

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May’s “Bowl and Cup”

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May’s “Guardian of the Vessel”

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May’s “Copper Red Vase”

Artist Spotlight: Shawn Niebruegge


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
Fairs, festivals, homecomings, and other local events represent some of the last places where neighbors gather for nothing more than the sake of celebrating togetherness. In a world enamored with digital socialization, these gatherings may seem to be relics of a bygone era; the increasingly isolated and insular conclaves of niche communities hardly allow for such mingling of diverse peoples. The raw and primal truth to this desire to be around each other – that is what I am interested in capturing.

I make snapshots for references to the moments I want to remember in better detail than my recall will supply. The circumstances of the events make it a rare occurrence that the photograph itself will be a successful final work. On very rare occasion it is true that to do any more would only diminish the statement. The intent, however, is to translate these experiences into the language and histories of painting and drawing.

Works
Tree of Life, 2016
22” x 30”
graphite

The Queen, Persephone, 2017
22” x 30”
graphite

The Chase, 2016
20” x 26”
colored pencil

Candy Alarm, 2014
10” x 15”
photograph

As American, 2016
10” x 15”
photograph

When I was younger…I’ve believed…impossible things… ,  2016
10” x 15”
photograph

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Niebruegge’s “The Chase”

Niebruegge's "Tree of Life" and "The Queen, Persephone" on far right

Niebruegge’s “Tree of Life” and “The Queen, Persephone” on far right

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Niebruegge’s “Tree of Life”

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Niebruegge’s “Candy Alarm”

Artist Spotlight: Don Bevirt


SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition
January 19 – February 23, 2017

Each Monday and Wednesday during the SWIC Art Faculty Exhibition, we will feature one of the exhibiting art instructors, including their artist statement and images of their works.

Statement
The World on the Other Side of the Mirror

By using the camera in a fluid way and post visualizing the final image, I can encounter a new reality. The photographic act consists of entering a space of intimate complicity, not to master it, but to play along with it and to demonstrate that nothing has been decided yet.

The instantaneity of photography is not to be confused with the simultaneity of real time. The flow of pictures produced and erased in real time is indifferent to the fluid dimension of the photographic moment.

In a sense, the photographic image materially translates a sense of reality, which is so obvious and so easily accepted because we already have the feeling that it is real, yet we are never in the real presence of the object. Between reality and its image, there is an impossible exchange. At best, one finds a visual correlation between reality and the image.

Works
Mirror Series: Tree, 2016
20” x 24”
digital print

Mirror Series: Escalator, 2015
16” x 20”
digital print

Alleyway Old San Juan, 2016
20” x 24”
digital color photograph

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Bevirt’s “Alleyway Old San Juan”

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Bevirt’s “Mirror Series: Tree”

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Bevirt’s “Mirror Series: Escalator”